Recruit your own brand army and equip them with grenades, fighter jets and guns…or end up like Domino’s Pizza

Domino’s Pizza has gotten themselves into a lot of trouble thanks to one of their employees. What’s interesting is the fact that they’ve ended up there even though they’ve done their homework on online presence. What’s lacking is obviously enough brand fans.

ReadWriteWeb reports on a video broadcast by two of Domino’s employees. The video that among other things, features an employee who farts and sneezes on a sandwich, was viewed over 500,000 times. RWW writes that Domino’s were quite fast to publish the response (below) to the video where they of course are explaining how something like this could happen – but is it enough?

This is only the beginning. As technology becomes easier to use brands will face industrial sabotage like this every week. The problem tomorrow or obviously already today is the fact that one single employee or competitor for that sake can do a lot of harm…A LOT OF HARM.

In order for companies to stand future attacks, brand communication becomes more important than ever since it’s the only protection they’ll have once something like this happens. Brand communication is the one thing that turns us into loyal and long term brand fans and therefore also gatekeepers.
Brand fans = drones. (Star Wars rock’s, doesn’t it?)

Imagine if Domino’s Pizza would have had a couple of million brand fans only waiting to be called into war. The fans would have killed the employee video with comments and created related videos. Once the official response above was published fans would instantly have created a viral spread of the video. Blogs would have been swarmed and Microblogs would have been buzzed until nothing stood in Domino’s way…

If you’re a brand owner. Start thinking. What can your brand really do for your customers. What can you give away. How can you make your brand fans loyal. And how can you gather their contact details so that you can direct them straight into the war zone? Start building walls, tanks, guns, jet fighters and everything you can think of. Then get your brand fans into training cause when the shit hits the fan you’ll be to close to the front and recruiting new soldiers will be the last thing on your mind.

ps. Just to clear things up. I’m a drone in many cases

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Curiosity. My greatest asset. Born 1971 and Raised in the suburbs of style city Stockholm, creativity was always a part of growing up. With a background as a former snowboard professional (with among others Greger Hagelin from WE and Per Holknekt from Odd Molly as sponsors) and one of the few in the world who nailed a 1440° spin, I started my career on the buyer side. Marketing exclusive golf brands such as Mizuno, King Cobra and Goldwin gave me insight into the demands of advertisers and consumers but foremost the complexity behind how products actually make it into the stores. Always full of ideas, I felt I needed to move on to the creative side of the business. Internet, on the rise in Sweden drew me into the digital revolution already in 1994. In 1998 however I joined Framfab, one of the late 90’s fast-moving companies. As a concept developer and key account manager I parted in creating award winning projects for clients like Vattenfall , Bredbandsbolaget, Nike Europe and Volvo Cars. I also held a position within Framfab Innovation. The incubator of new ideas within Framfab. After Framfab had grown in just two years from 130 employees to 3400, I felt I needed to move to a smaller organization. Abel & Baker - in 2001 the worlds most awarded digital advertising company attracted me. At A&B I tool part in winning the global account for adidas, but I also worked with MTV, Nokia, Toyota, Årets Kock, ICA and the Red Cross. In 2002 I left Abel & Baker to found something of my own - Foreign. Foreign - an ideas creator with focus on the communication of tomorrow - based in Stockholm, Sweden. Foreign quickly grew to 27 employees and was awarded in the Cannes Lions, D&AD, New York Festivals, London International Advertising Awards, Epica, Clio, Cresta and other award shows every year since start up. Foreign launched both digital and integrated global campaigns for BMW Motorrad, MTV, H&M, IKEA, Omega, Beckers, Com Hem, Intersport, Kosta Boda, adidas International and many more. In September 2008 I took the decision to close Foreign down after almost 7 years. I’m now consulting within the same business on my own. Apart from Foreign I’ve also founded WhiskyGrotto.com and Co-Founded PremierGoals.com. Thru the years, leadership and success has been important, but enjoying life, loyalty and sincerity is what drives me further. I consider my part in motivating adidas to let fairly small Foreign handle adidas global digital World Cup campaigns my proudest moment in business. The birth of my two daughters Ebba & Linn is my proudest moment in life.

  • http://heimercompany.se/ Magnla

    Really interesting case there.

    ( I acctually dreamt about Dominos last night weird)

  • http://heimercompany.se Magnla

    Really interesting case there.

    ( I acctually dreamt about Dominos last night weird)

  • http://mikkefolio.com/ Michael

    Love how the female in the video is actually a sex offender ^^ Way to hire staff!

    http://ncfindoffender.com/details.aspx?SRN=016454S11

  • http://mikkefolio.com Michael

    Love how the female in the video is actually a sex offender ^^ Way to hire staff!

    http://ncfindoffender.com/details.aspx?SRN=016454S11

  • http://onemorecupofcoffe.blogspot.com/ Joanna

    Maybe I’m completely wrong here, but I think the main problem for this type of fast food companies (chains) is that they don’t offer food and service that is excellent enough to turn customers into brand fans. I think in Domino’s particular case, their website and ordering system have definitely helped strengthen the brand (and the 30 minute delivery guarantee, although limited, has certainly helped too).

    However, the food you get is often cold and while it will decently satisfy a temporary craving for junk food, it’s not that good. Taste wise (and temperature wise), it just can’t compete with your local pizza place on the corner. I wonder if that’s makes customers remain just customers?

  • http://onemorecupofcoffe.blogspot.com/ Joanna

    Maybe I’m completely wrong here, but I think the main problem for this type of fast food companies (chains) is that they don’t offer food and service that is excellent enough to turn customers into brand fans. I think in Domino’s particular case, their website and ordering system have definitely helped strengthen the brand (and the 30 minute delivery guarantee, although limited, has certainly helped too).

    However, the food you get is often cold and while it will decently satisfy a temporary craving for junk food, it’s not that good. Taste wise (and temperature wise), it just can’t compete with your local pizza place on the corner. I wonder if that’s makes customers remain just customers?

  • http://onemorecupofcoffe.blogspot.com Joanna

    Maybe I’m completely wrong here, but I think the main problem for this type of fast food companies (chains) is that they don’t offer food and service that is excellent enough to turn customers into brand fans. I think in Domino’s particular case, their website and ordering system have definitely helped strengthen the brand (and the 30 minute delivery guarantee, although limited, has certainly helped too).

    However, the food you get is often cold and while it will decently satisfy a temporary craving for junk food, it’s not that good. Taste wise (and temperature wise), it just can’t compete with your local pizza place on the corner. I wonder if that’s makes customers remain just customers?

  • http://www.ronnestam.com/ ronnestam

    Chipotle and YoSushi are two examples that I would say are exactly the contrary to what Dominos is. They are both about fast food but they’ve turned the experience into something else than what you’re explaining.

    They are not ready for war just yet though ;)

  • http://www.ronnestam.com/ ronnestam

    Chipotle and YoSushi are two examples that I would say are exactly the contrary to what Dominos is. They are both about fast food but they’ve turned the experience into something else than what you’re explaining.

    They are not ready for war just yet though ;)

  • http://www.ronnestam.com ronnestam

    Chipotle and YoSushi are two examples that I would say are exactly the contrary to what Dominos is. They are both about fast food but they’ve turned the experience into something else than what you’re explaining.

    They are not ready for war just yet though ;)

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